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Abstract

Molecular Characteristics of Probiotics Lactic Acid Bacteria Isolated from Soursop, Cowmilk, Goatmilk Yoghurts and Cheese

Probiotics are living, non-pathogenic microorganisms which has positive effect on consumers. Yoghurt is among the most common dairy products consumed around the world. Different varieties of wild fruits could be of health benefit, one such is soursop fruit (Annona muricata). They are fruits that are good sources of vitamins and minerals. Goat milk is naturally predisposed for preparing a yoghurt drink that is light and easily digestible. Fermented drinks made of goat milk differ from the drinks made of cow milk, among other things, by a lower content of volatile aroma compounds (and especially of acetaldehyde and carbon dioxide. Cheese is white soft non-ripened milk made by the addition of a plant extract (Calotropis procera) to the non-pasteurized whole milk from cattle. The study was aimed at isolation and molecular characterization of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from soursop, cowmilk, goatmilk yoghurts and cheese. Twenty-four bacterial strains were isolated, according to biochemical identification and only 16 were characterize as: Lactobacillus plantarium, Lactobacillus fermentus, Bacillus substilis, Bacillus subsitils, Lactobacillus rhaminosus, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus paracase, Lactobacillus licheniformis, Lactobacillus planetarium, Lactobacillus licheniformis, Bacillus substilis, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactobacillus fermentus, Lactobacillus fermentus, Lactobacillus licheniformis, Lactobacillus rhaminouus, Lactobacillus licheniformis. The isolates were characterize on the basis of their morphological, biochemical, physiological and 16S rRNA gene sequences. All of the isolates were well identified with the help of molecular techniques. The study concluded that the isolated lactic acid bacteria could be considered as potential candidates for starter culture in dairy industry.


Author(s): Abiona SO and Adegoke GO

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