Previous Page  4 / 20 Next Page
Information
Show Menu
Previous Page 4 / 20 Next Page
Page Background

allied

academies

Biochem Mol biol J

ISSN: 2471-8084

Volume 3, Issue 2

Metabolomics Conference 2017

August 29-30, 2017 Prague, Czech Republic

9

th

International Conference and Exhibition on

Metabolomics and Systems Biology

Notes:

Page 18

Blood-based metabolomic biomarkers for

human neurological disorders

Massimo S Fiandaca

1

, Mark Mapstone

1

, Amin Mahmoodi

1

, Thomas

Gross

1

, Amrita K Cheema

2

, Fabio Macciardi

1

, Kian Merchant-Borna

3

,

Jeff Bazarian

3

and

Howard J Federoff

1

1

University of California, Irvine, USA

2

Georgetown University, USA

3

University of Rochester Medical Center, USA

F

ormanyhumanmaladies, especiallyneurodegenerative

disorders (e.g., Alzheimer’s disease, AD, and

Parkinson’s disease, PD) the ability to predict disease risk

during asymptomatic stages is essential for earlier and

more efficacious interventions. Blood-based biomarkers

for AD (and PD), once defined and validated, may facilitate

the participation of at-risk asymptomatic individuals

in therapeutic clinical trials, and thereby increase the

potential for successful prevention and/or disease

modification. In conditions such as mild traumatic brain

injury (mTBI), relevant blood bio-signatures could provide

unbiased diagnostics that significantly improve clinical

decision-making and improved treatments. Blood-based

metabolomic biomarkers may offer such diagnostic and

therapeutic potential in both AD and mTBI, as evidenced

by our recent work. In this seminar, I plan to discuss

our group’s approaches to blood-based metabolomic

biomarker development and present results from our

most recent metabolomic investigations related to AD

and mTBI. We are encouraged by the potential provided

by both untargeted and targeted metabolomic platforms

in defining annotated species that are germane to the

respective clinical conditions. We also provide caution to

those exploring this area of research since there are many

confounding factors that need close scrutiny in an effort to

maximize clinical utility.

Biography

Massimo S Fiandaca is a Neuroscientist and Associate Professor in the

Department of Neurology and Neurological Surgery at University of California

Irvine (UCI). As Co-director of the Federoff Translational Laboratory and

Biorepository (TLaB) at UCI, he is currently focused on blood-based

biomarkers related to neurological disorders. Through established local,

national, and international collaborations, he and his colleagues hope to impact

the development of relevant blood-based biomarkers for a variety of conditions

affecting the nervous system. He is a board certified Neurological Surgeon,

who retired from surgical practice after 25 years, and returned to full-time

academic research and teaching. His past research experiences have focused

on direct brain delivery of therapeutics for neurodegenerative disorders and

neuro-oncology, including cellular and tissue transplantation, viral-vector

based therapeutic gene delivery, MRI-directed convection-enhanced delivery,

and nano-liposomal therapeutics.

[email protected]

Massimo S Fiandaca et al., Biochem Mol biol J, 3:2

DOI: 10.21767/2471-8084-C1-002