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Abstract

A survey of Nurse Prescribers’ s use of information sources and the influences-and feelings about their prescribing practices

The aim of this presentation is to report on Nurse Prescribers’ use of information sources and the influences-and feelings about their current prescribing practices. Significant benefits to effective and efficient health service provision has been achieved since nurses and midwives have been empowered to expand their scope of practice by the extension of prescriptive authority. This has resulted in increased professional recognition and respect, enhanced career development as well as increased nursing autonomy. Extant literature suggest that patients generally appear satisfied with nurse prescribing on a range of different aspects, including accessibility, timeliness and convenience. Although, understanding that prescriptive authority enhances the capacity for nurses and midwives to work to their full scope of practice, there are few studies that have explored the influences and feelings of nurse prescribers about their prescribing practices. Cross-sectional national survey of all registered nurse and midwife prescribers in the Republic of Ireland (n=1050) was undertaken. Data were collected between April and July 2018. A total of 129 participants returned the questionnaire. This resulted in the inclusion of 83 participants which is representative of 8.3% response rate. The most important sources of information on medicines were professional colleagues, the British National Formulary and pharmacists. The most important influence reported by respondents were the appearance of adverse drug reactions. Nurse prescribers reported high levels of feeling useful, satisfied and trusted when prescribing, with low levels of anxiety related to worry and tension. Nurse prescribers are conscious of patient safety as expressed in their awareness of adverse drug reactions in patients. In this regard, they experience satisfaction and usefulness and through their prescribing behaviors contribute to the provision of safe quality patient care.


Author(s): Mary Casey

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