Ayman I. Sayegh

Ayman I. Sayegh
Professor, Associate Dean for Research and Advanced Studies, College of Veterinary Medicine, Williams-Bowie Hall 101, Clinical Anatomy 204, Tuskegee, Alabama 36088, USA
 
Biography
Dr. Sayegh is a Professor of Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Tuskegee University and Associate Dean for Research and Advanced Studies. He attended Baghdad University (Iraq, Veterinary Medicine), Kansas State University (MS), Purdue University (Equine Medicine and Surgery), University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign (Equine Medicine and Surgery) and Washington State University (PhD, Neuroscience). His research focuses on localizing the peripheral site(s) of action for gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) and cholecystokinin (CCK), which evoke reduction of meal size and prolongation of the intermeal interval, by delivering the peptides into specific regions in the gastrointestinal tract through (1) utilizing a microsurgical, intra-arterial catheterization technique, (2) analyzing the min-to-min behaviors that lead to feeding to determine meal sizes, intermeal interval and satiety ratio, (3) using a BioDAQ feeding system to record and analyze the feeding behavior of the rats in a freely-fed, undisturbed environment. In addition, we use immunohistochemical detection of neuronal markers and various surgical techniques e.g. vagotomy, sympathectomy and myotomy / myectomy to determine the possible neuronal pathways by which these peptide reduce meal size and prolong the intermeal interval. The work is funded by the NIH and various pharmaceutical companies
 
Research Interest
His research focuses on localizing the peripheral site(s) of action for gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) and cholecystokinin (CCK), which evoke reduction of meal size and prolongation of the intermeal interval, by delivering the peptides into specific regions in the gastrointestinal tract through (1) utilizing a microsurgical, intra-arterial catheterization technique, (2) analyzing the min-to-min behaviors that lead to feeding to determine meal sizes, intermeal interval and satiety ratio, (3) using a BioDAQ feeding system to record and analyze the feeding behavior of the rats in a freely-fed, undisturbed environment. In addition, we use immunohistochemical detection of neuronal markers and various surgical techniques e.g. vagotomy, sympathectomy and myotomy / myectomy to determine the possible neuronal pathways by which these peptide reduce meal size and prolong the intermeal interval. The work is funded by the NIH and various pharmaceutical companies.