Mathew T. Mathew

Mathew T. Mathew
Co-Director, Institute of Biomaterials, Tribocorrosion and Nano-medicine and Department of Orthopedics, Rush University Medical Center, USA
 
Biography
Currently, I am an assistant professor at Orthopaedic Surgery (Rush University Medical Centre) and involved research and teaching activities in the area of biomedical implants and biomechanics. My main research areas are corrosion and tribocorrosion aspects of implant bio-materials in dentistry and orthopaedics. Biomedical implants are increasingly used to assist the patients with disability and bring comfort and continue their healthy physical activities with an expected level. As the behavior of a metal implant in a body environment is a complex issue, the objective of this research is to find an optimum solution related to longevity, biocompatibility and stability by adopting an interdisciplinary approach. By using the concept of synergism between wear and corrosion, I would like to understand not only the degradation mechanisms but also provide solutions to prevent the failure. Such findings can be useful in producing implants with customized surfaces, with superior wear and corrosion resistance, without affecting the required biocompatibility. During last 7 years, as the application of tribocorrosion aspects on the dental implants is a vital area, I established a strong research link with the College of Dentistry, University of Illinois in Chicago and working with a capacity of Research Assistant Professor
 
Research Interest
Dr. Mathew’s main research areas are corrosion and tribocorrosion aspects of implant bio-materials in dentistry and orthopaedics. As the behavior of a metal implant (dental implants, TMJ implants) in a body environment is a complex issue, the objective of his research is to find an optimum solution related to longevity, biocompatibility and stability by adopting an interdisciplinary approach. By using the concept of synergism between wear and corrosion (tribocorrosion), he would like to understand not only the degradation mechanisms but also provide solutions to prevent the failure and/or early prediction of the failure processes. Such findings can be useful in producing implants with customized surfaces, with superior wear and corrosion resistance, with the required biocompatibility.