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Abstract

Current trend of caesarean sections and vaginal births

Caesarean section rates are inexorably rising which has led to the possibility of negative impact on maternal and neonatal health. Present study was aimed to compare the factors associated with caesarean and vaginal births among pregnant women. A retrospective study was conducted in Obstetrics and Gynaecology Department, Punjab Institute of Medical Sciences, Jalandhar (Punjab, India) during the period of April, 2012 to June, 2012. Details of age group, parity, socioeconomic status, antenatal booking, mode of delivery, obstetric complications, gestational age at delivery, maternal and neonatal outcomes were explored. The prevalence of Caesarean Sections (65%) was higher over vaginal births (35%). It had higher number of Emergency (52.31%) over Elective (47.70%) caesarean sections. Multiparity (55.38%; p<0.05), high socioeconomic status (18.46%), 21 to 30 yrs of age group (78.46%) and booked status (44.62%) were associated with Caesarean Sections while primiparity (65.71%) and low socioeconomic status (22.86%) with vaginal births. The commonest reasons for Caesarean Sections were Fetal Distress (30.77%) and Repeat Caesarean Sections (29.23%). Caesarean sections rate is high. High number of referred patients who underwent Emergency sections was the main reason. Trial of vaginal birth after Caesarean Section in approximate cases and confirmation of suspected fetal distress through fetal blood acid base study are recommended


Author(s): Jaspinder Kaur, Sargun Singh and Kawaljit Kaur

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